For years, well-articulated and well-used features and attendant generic benefits of products and services were usually enough to move consumers to a purchase decision. Not any longer!

 

In this new “the consumer rules” era, sales presentations must shift fully to your customers’ perspective. In every presentation only one perspective matters — theirs. Not yours, not the company’s, only the customer’s perspective.

 

A sales rep for a client of ours, Insult-Sales of Ontario, consistently outperformed his peers. He illuminated in a way anyone could use on how to communicate value solely from the buyer’s perspective.  When we met, I asked him about his impressive success and closing ratio.

 

“Look at this,” he replied, pointing to an empty box of Fab laundry detergent on his desk and said

 

“This keeps me focused on why people buy from me!”

 

“Everybody else in roofing talks about their most popular features, that’s the F. Then everybody talks about their so-called obvious benefits — that’s the B. But I keep the box of Fab handy so I never forget to talk about the A. The A is what they accomplish, the actual advantages they receive from all our great roofing features and our firm.

People always say they want a new roof, but I ask good questions about what they want and why, then I only focus on and talk about appropriate features and the actual advantages of each to get them the personal benefits they want.”

 

“In reality, I really don’t sell roofs. I sell things like our thirty-year warranty and how it gives them the advantage of increased home value and I point out the benefit to them is it makes their  house easier to sell when they move to Florida, or how our specialty shingles give them the advantage of warmer houses and the benefit to them is lower heating bills.”

 

 

 

This advantage-based selling process is the exact, specific, tactical response every sales professional needs, regardless of what they are selling in today’s world. It provides the perfect path to explain the and how of your company and products from the customers’ perspective. Are you willing to switch to Fab?

 

Actions Required

 

Ask yourself:

  1. Have potential buyers said, “I don’t know” or “I am not sure” or “we need to think about it “far too often?
  2. Is “the price (or fee) seems high” a common objection?
  3. Are you clear on the specific functional advantages and emotional benefits that every attribute and feature of your business or its products delivers?

 

For help with creating your own Advantage Based Selling Matrixes check out

 www.PowerofWhy.net

 Or contact us at

 www.WeylmanConsultingGroup.com

 


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